Casting Comments

(Brief details of doubling/ special requirements etc)

It is important that LARRY is a rising star capable of being totally independent. JILL makes the emotional journey of lovestruck to open anger over an answering machine speaker. BONAPARTE, JILL's dog, makes an entrance at the end of the play and attempts to attack the revolver pointed at JILL in HARRY's possession.

Short Description

A one-act drama about finding love in Greenwich Village, 1981, "DANCE" also explores homicidal rage.

HARRY wants a satisfying sexual relationship with LARRY, but LARRY is concerned about his gay lifestyle since his friends and ex-lovers began dying from a terrorizing virus. JILL, who has fallen madly in love with LARRY and needs to terminate her physical state of virginity ASAP, has locked herself out of her apartment while walking her dog, BONAPARTE. When LARRY decides to change his lifestyle and lets JILL into his loft, HARRY in a moment of jealous rage decides to kill him. Driven by a desperate need to share an intimate relationship with someone, almost anyone, these characters are part of a generation spanning the Vietnam War to the advent of AIDS that harbors an acceptance of the knowledge that free love, sex, drugs and art will never again be as they were.

Rights & Royalties

All rights are currently available.

Permission to produce "DANCE WITH ME, PLEASE?" may be granted to an individual producer or corporation upon application to the author/playwright. (Permission granted in this manner cannot be withdrawn from authorized scheduled productions within ninety days of the production date.)

Character Breakdown

LARRY: Attractive, energetic, athletic-looking homosexual male, mid-twenties; a sculptor who has been blind since childhood.

HARRY: Confident and aristocratic bearing male; late forties, LARRY's house guest and lover.

BONAPARTE: Dog, Pit-bull, black with a white patch on its throat, very obedient, protective.

JILL. African-American female, mid-twenties, free spirited virgin, advertising copywriter, in love with LARRY.

HARRY and LARRY are the main characters

Set/Technical Requirements

Description of essential set, props, LX, costumes, etc.

1 scene, 1 set: top floor of a 12-story building, Tribecca district of Manhattan. The sculptor's loft is sparsely and well-furnished. Bathroom and spiral staircase to duplex bedroom downstage right and left, respectively. Elevator door upstage left. Artist's studio begins downstage left and extends conceptually into the audience. A skylight is over the audience and a cold city light filters through it, lighting the audience dimly from above. Mise en Scéne allows the audience to be character during HARRY's action and LARRY's minds eye.

LARRY: costumed grungy punk-rock before it was fashionable. He wears an old black leather, silver tipped belt, with a large buckle.

HARRY: ex-creative director in advertising; costumed early Ralph Lauren

JILL: Madison avenue copywriter type costume, after work.

Harry's and Jill's costumes are period specific, 1981-1982.

DETAILED PLOT DESCRIPTION

A 55 minute one-act drama about finding love in Greenwich Village, 1981, "DANCE" also explores homicidal rage. HARRY wants a satisfying sexual relationship with LARRY, but LARRY is concerned about his gay lifestyle since his friends and ex-lovers began dying from a terrorizing virus. After fixing dinner, LARRY tells HARRY he must move out, but instead of leaving HARRY dances with LARRY. LARRY receives a series of telephone calls from JILL over his answering machine speaker. JILL, who has fallen madly in love with LARRY and needs to terminate her physical state of virginity ASAP, has locked herself out of her apartment while walking her dog. After the second recorded message from JILL for the keys she loaned LARRY that morning, LARRY shows HARRY an unsigned note that was left that afternoon and asks HARRY to read it to him. It describes a sexual encounter between two men and HARRY suspects one of them was LARRY. Regardless, HARRY, after confessing his involvement as a Captain in the search and destroy missions during the Vietnam war, begs to be held. LARRY refuses until HARRY tells him of his wife's homicide. While telling LARRY what he wants to hear, and before being comforted by him, HARRY removes a revolver and silencer from his attaché case under the sofa. When JILL finally arrives at the building by cab LARRY invites her upstairs. HARRY in a moment of rage fed by jealousy decides to kill LARRY, but is thwarted by BONAPARTE and JILL entering the loft. JILL instantly recognizes HARRY as the acquitted wife killer from Chicago. Tableau vivant segués to the sound of screaming children. .

SELECT READER COMMENTS:

". . . I admired the erudition and wit in the work . . . you are obviously a writing talent . . . " Scott Klaven, Literary Manager, THEATER BY THE BLIND, NYC.

"Strongly written dialogue and intense characterization . . . " Jim Patrick, Founding Artistic Director, NANTUCKET THEATRICAL PRODUCTIONS